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Volubilis ruins

Volubilis ruins or Roman ruins of Morocco is a Berber city originally named Alili in Tamazight (Berber language) which means oleander because the region is known by the oleander tree in that era as a city built in a very fecund land.

Volubilis ruins are located 30KM from Meknes, officially studied as the earliest capital of the Berber Mauritanian kingdom, due to being erected for the first time by local Berbers in the 3rd century BC, then primitive Carthaginian trading post, before being the capital of Mauretania.

Volubilis swiftly developed under the control of the Romans from the 1st century AD ahead and enlarged to cover around 40 hectares with almost 3 km round of walls. These Roman ruins of Morocco obtained several crucial common constructions in the second century, such as a temple, triumphal arch, and basilica. Its boom, which was based on agriculture, especially growing olives, contributed to building the biggest part of the town.

The Volubilis town fell to the native Berber tribes about 280 then never fell to Romans due to its farness and carelessness on the south-western of the Roman empire borders. It keeps on being occupied for about another 700 years, first as a Latinised Christian Berber section, then as an early Islamic dominion force. The Idriss Iben Abdullah became the ruler of the Roman ruins of Morocco by exploiting the religion and the best of the local Berbers in the late 8th century.

The Volubilis has been deserted after the relocation of the power seat to Fes in the 11th century before it moves to almoravids in Marrakech.

Some of the locals were transferred to Fes and the rest moved to a near area to construct a new town of Molay Driss Zerhoun.

The city of Volubilis remained significantly complete till it was destroyed in the 18th century by an earthquake and afterward looted by local leaders looking for stones to build Meknes. In the 19th  century, the site was decisively recognized as that of the Volubilis ruins. Around half of the ruins were excavated, during the French colonization disclosing some fine mosaics, and some of the more outstanding common constructions and high-status houses were rebuilt. Later on, The Volubilis was recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, identified as an exceptional well-protected example of a big Roman colonial city on the fringes of the Empire”. which makes it nicknamed the Roman ruins of Morocco.